The Girl Can Blomment

The Girl Can Blomment
I have been blogging since 2004. Scattered around the web, my blogs have mostly fallen into the dead zone of blog abandonment, or, as in the case of Yahoo! 360° where I blogged in earnest for over two years, the blog was closed down. Yahoo! 360° was where I got my feet wet and where, because it had a social networking component, I became closely connected to a posse of readers whom I now call close friends. Since the demise of 360° we gather now on the pages of Facebook and Multiply. I still blog very regularly at Multiply. It is the place where I can share with close family and these bloggy friends of mine the things *really* going on, the things I don’t clean up for consumption on this blog, my most public place of writing. Multiply is the place I feel free to say the “f” word and be a little whiny because that’s sometimes how I roll.
It is also the place I am known as The Blomment Queen. A “blomment” or sometimes “blogment” was coined long ago on my 360° page by my contact New York Eddie. It means to write a blog post in comments either on someone else’s blog or on your own in your own comments as a kind of “blog extension.”
I have already said it here that I am WORDY. I go for looooong instead of concise. It’s not really the style of writing well-suited to blogging; it’s more for epic novel writing and if I had it in me to write novels, mine would be that sort which winds up being 1,000 pages long.
I just find that I have a lot to say, and I love to respond to people and their writing on their blogs, too! It’s part of what makes me who I am, and I pretty much go with it guilt- and shame-free until I do it in a setting where I think, “Oh my god. I just spilled all that over X’s page.” I think I worry that by posting such long comments people will think, “Hey — she’s trying to one-up the blogger” or “Look at her, she’s trying to hijack that blog with one of her own in the comments.”
When I do this in a setting where people do not really *know* me, not like my friends and regular readers on Multiply, I feel ashamed, like I spilled milk on the Queen’s best rug or something. In fact, a blomment is how I best show appreciation, and I have contacts today who keep me around just SO I will blomment for them. They know and understand its purity in love for them and their blogs.
I blommented today, and felt a little guilty about it. I was on David Lebovitz’s blog on his recent post about “8 Coping Tips for Living in Paris.” http://www.davidlebovitz.com/archives/2009/10/8_coping_tips_for_living_in_pari.html
I got so excited about the topic and had so much to say that I blommented all over the place and then went ahead and posted it.
I just went and re-read it, and I still think it sounds pretty good, for having gone off all over his comments. But I think I feel guilt and shame because of this for a few reasons. For starters: he’s a famous and well-liked guy and/but I honest-to-goodness feel like, when I read his blog, he is one of the posse with whom I have been blogging for a long time. Maybe it is in part that the bloggers whom I read are great writers, like David, so he just feels like one more of the crew.
The blogs I read are mostly by my now-friends, though a few years ago I knew none of those treasured souls. For example, I think of Ken, who comments here, and who hits me in the gut every time he writes about what it was like growing up in california in the 1970s. Then there’s my friend, Michelle, who was chosen as a Yahoo! 360° featured blogger back in 2005. In fact, I think that’s how I connected to her; it’s how many did. She was my first visitor here in Paris last December. See? I have grown close to the people with whom I blog, and there is something about David Lebovitz that recalls this feeling of connectedness and I can’t help but think of him being like my gay, older brother or something, lol. He’s just *that* great and his voice on his blog is *that* great. He makes everyone feel like he or she is his friend on his blog. He even RECOMMENTS (replies to people in comments), for Pete’s sake! How many powerhouse bloggers DO that, eh? Anyway, David is pretty much a Regular Blog Guy and I feel like he has been in my blog circle for years.
Here’s the thing about blommenting on his page, though, that is making my want to self-flaggelate: I feel like by starting this blog on Paris I have gone to a newer, bigger high school. It’s the High School of Paris Blogs. It’s the new school year, and I am a lowly freshman, trying out this less whiny, more professional, less f-bomb, more photo-styled sort of endeavor, and, admittedly, going and commenting on David’s blog and leaving my links there because I also get a lot of traffic from his blog to mine, lol. Yeah! Another reason to feel guilty! I am totally leeching off of his blog life-blood! I mean, I go there because he is witty and cool and informative, but so do other people because he is witty, cool, and informative, and other people have gone from his blog to mine. I think I am hoping for wittiness, coolness, and informativeness by association!
Anyway (starting to see WHY I blomment?!), I am this little freshman blogger when it comes to public Paris blogs and he is like the big, popular senior in Paris Blog High — the one that is for SURE going to be Prom King. Successful pastry chef, writer, traveler, blogger — I mean, the guy has even been on TV. And I comment on his blogs because I like him, I like what he represents, I like his outlook on life, and every time I go there, I think, “Maybe he’ll notice me!”  and, if he notices me, then SO WILL EVERYONE ELSE. OMG, this is like the plot of every John Hughes (god rest his beautiful soul) film of the 1980′s. I am Molly Ringwald in either “Sixteen Candles” or “Pretty in Pink” and David is Jane Ryan or Blane McDonnagh (Andren McCarthy *swoon*). When I comment there, it is like I am dreaming of going to prom in PBHS and being prom queen on my own.
And then I think, “Do I really WANT that in my life? To lose anonymity or to have to keep up a persona in blog life that may not really represent ME?” but that is a whole ‘nother blog topic on which I have been ruminating.
So, let me get to the point here. I feel guilt about blommenting. But I was so darn excited about the post that I knew I had to write one of my own about the same topic: Pariskarin’s Coping Tips for Living in Paris.
To preface my own tips, this is what I wrote on David Lebovitz’s post:
Fantastic post, David, and yes, in principle, after living here for 16 months, I think these are perfect suggestions!! I have a couple things to add, though, because in my “sitch” doing a few of those items up there is complicated for me.
I have to eat dairy, gluten/wheat, sugar, and yeast-free. This means no chocolate, no wine, no pastries, although I have TOTALLY cheated with macarons, lol — at least they don’t have dairy (I don’t think…), gluten, and yeast, so three out of four ain’t bad. Food and drink-related comforts are not really available to me, though, which pretty much sucks some days and can make coping really tough. This past month, I also gave up smoking and coffee. I know, I know!! :p It’s been pretty hard to have one’s comforts in food, drink, and smoke not be available. Yeah, I chose to eat this way but it was because my body was pretty much falling apart without making these changes. The stress of being in a new place was what triggered reactions in my body to start to give out. I felt I had to make all these changes or suffer. And I am doing a lot better, which is the good news! :) Anyway, it’s still hard to not have some of the coping tools on your list up there.
But I have had to learn to cope. We all do, eh?
For someone who has a limited budget (a *really* limited one as I am not working and my BF is an English teacher & supports the two of us), even the shopping is out most days. But, I am finding there is still a lot to do to be able to cope, to find the happy and balance inside when living in a place that, at least for me, often makes me feel like I am a completely retarded child (sorry to use such a non-pc term, but I mean it in a colloquial sense, too).
The suggestion I love the most up there and the one I *do* have available to me & which I engage in regularly is taking trips in Paris. That one item is the thing that has really saved me in trying to handle living in this foreign place — and to milk it for how and what I can. I have learned that what gives me peace in my head is going out in to the city and taking pictures of it. I am not the greatest photographer, but it give my mind something to focus on, something to center it when the merde hits the ventilateur and you think your head is going to explode with it.
And then I started to blog about those trips, hahaha.
I am *so* stealing this post idea, to be properly credited, of course. I best write about this on my own blog instead of here. No fair to highjack your post. I loved reading about your eight ways of coping, though, and what I see that the root of this list is trying to say is “Find the enjoyment that you CAN. Find it in something small, find it for yourself, but FIND it.” That’s great advice whether one is living somewhere foreign or not. I see this way-of-thinking in your blog and in how you present yourself living your life in it. You rock. :)
So, eliminating food and drink from the whole Coping Toolbox, what is there that is left?
1. I Blog.
Hahahahahaha. Seriously, in the 16 months I have lived here, writing at Multiply, Facebook, occasionally MySpace are how I have coped best. When I experienced the crippling agoraphobia and total anxiety about even going out the apartment door a little over a year ago when I first arrived, I knew that my friends were available to me at my fingertips through social networking sites and email. I have used the internet as probably my number one coping mechanism and I am very grateful for it.
This blog, as I explained early on, was born as an attempt to help me get out and live life. Sitting in PJs and my apartment day after day, doing housework and keeping up with bloglife is not much of a life. By getting out and about, I experience more of the city and enlarge my life and my existence.
2. As David wrote, I take a trip IN Paris. That’s what THIS is — my records of the things I see and experience in the city. I whine and curse on the other blogs, lol. This is the one where I try to find the BEST in living in a place like Paris, even though I feel, most times, like a freaked out retarded child in it. It’s getting better. I feel less and less retarded the more I force myself to chronicle things for this blog.
3. I watch movies.
I’ve written about it here, reviewed movies here (for example – http://analienparisienne.wordpress.com/2009/09/25/karin-julie-julia/). PJ and I have a UGC Illimté pass. (http://www.ugc.fr/typepage.do?alias=carteugcillimite)
For 19 € 80 per month for UGC Carte Illimité or 35 €  per month for a pass for two people (which we have), PJ and I can go and see an unlimited number of movies. We live just near the Mk2 Quai de Loire and Quai de Seine theaters (http://www.mk2.com/sallescinema-16-mk2quaideloire.html), which take the passes. We also like to go to the Georges V theater on the Champs Elysée as it is close to PJ’s job. http://www.allocine.fr/seance/salle_gen_csalle=C0112.html
To escape into the dark of a theater for a couple of hours and see some of the latest cinema from the States in a language I understand is a true “reset button” for me. I know, it may seem silly to see a bunch of American movies in Paris, but remember, this is a list about how to cope when, as I put it up there in the comment on David’s page, the merde hits the ventilateur and you need ESCAPE from the culture at hand. I am 41. I am (saying this tongue-in-cheek, mostly) not always the most stable of people! I need this a lot. :)
4. I watch TV.
We have a FreeBox. If you live in France and want decent bundled internet/TV/phone and not much hassle, I would say go with Free. http://portail.free.fr/
Here’s what I like best about it. Free Home Video http://www.free.fr/adsl/pages/television/services-de-vod/free-home-video.html is an extra 12 € a month, but in my opinion, it is worth it, if you want to have access to English movies and TV series. PJ and I like to watch a lot on the tube. It’s a good way for him to relax and check out after a day of working with clients in the business English program at which he is an instructor. For me, it is a way to understand TV. I have recently become hooked on Season 1 of Gossip Girl, which is now available on FHV.
Also, several shows on the stations M6 (http://www.m6.fr/)and TF1 (http://www.tf1.fr/) are now being broadcast in English if you have a TV or the cable box setup with which you can switch the languages. CSI (Les Expérts) Vegas, Miami and New York are shown in English as are the newest seasons of Bones and Desperate Housewives. There are more programs where one can switch to VM (vérsion multiligual) but that I don’t watch regularly, such as Grey’s Anatomy. Also, old movies on the Turner Classic Movies channel (http://tcmcinema.fr/) can be accessed in English as well, if they originate from the U.S.
There is one show I can and do watch in French, and have loved since I got here and first saw it: Un dîner presque parfait on http://undinerpresqueparfait.m6.fr/
It’s a week-long competition of cooking where five contestants compete to see who can prepare and serve the almost perfect dinner party, with ambiance, decorations and delicious food. Competitors rate one another on a scale of 1-10 on the cooking, the ambiance, and the decorations and the participant with the highest average score at the end of the week wins 1,000 €. It’s on weekdays starting at 17.50, which really means 10 minutes to six PM. 5:50 PM. I can’t believe after 16 months I still have to figure out what time it is past noon by subtracting 12. Doing freakin’ MATH every time I want to know what time someone is talking about here makes me MAD, in the British sense of the term. Imagine me talking in a Gwneyth Paltrow adopted British accent when I write that and you’ve got what’s in my head.
5. I take photos.
A couple of people on Multiply about a year ago after I posted photos of Paris on my page there commented on how much they liked my photography. I started to go out and take more photos to post on my page at the request of my friends there. As a result of that, one of my good online friends started to use some of my photography for her graphic design projects.
Paris is a world fashion headquarters. I often think of her as one of the top models which grace her fashion magazines: it’s hard to take a bad photo of her! It seems every corner I turn, I see something new, I see something unique, beautiful, and quitessentially Paris. Going out with my little Nikon Coolpix, I know I can get my head back on straight with centering in on capturing with the lens what I see around me. This has been a true balm to my soul.
Check out my Flickr page here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/karinlynn/
Now, rinse and repeat!
I have trouble coming up with eight. These are my top five. I cycle through them day after day.
Here’s my hope: by blommenting on David’s blog, by visiting others here in Paris Blog High School and leaving my droppings (aka comments), I hope I meet others that are here. I have been learning a TON about the city from these bloggers. I hope that perhaps one of them will be much like the blogging friends I have in other places. That we will read one anothers’ posts and become friendly, that we will like one another and maybe hang out sometime. I won’t hold my breath or anything, but maybe David will ask me to Prom!
In the future I hope to comprehensively list here some of the Paris bloggers that I have been visiting, but for starters, try Donna’s blog here: http://www.bestfriendinparis.com/ and Shelli and Gene’s blog here: http://areweinparisyet.blogspot.com/
These are two lovely people I have met online, and I think it was through David’s blog! Which, of course, is here: http://www.davidlebovitz.com/
Photo found at The Foodinista - Linked

Photo found at The Foodinista dot WordPress dot com

I have blogged since 2004. Scattered around the web, my blogs have mostly fallen into the dead zone of blog abandonment, or, as in the case of Yahoo! 360° where I blogged in earnest for over two years, the blog was closed down. Yahoo! 360° was where I got my feet wet and where, because it had a social networking component, I became closely connected to a posse of readers whom I now call close friends. Since the demise of 360° we gather now on the pages of Facebook and Multiply. I still blog very regularly at Multiply. It is the place where I can share with close family and these bloggy friends of mine the things *really* going on, the things I don’t clean up for consumption on this blog, my most public place of writing. Multiply is the place I feel free to say the “f” word and be a little whiny because that’s sometimes how I roll.

It is also the place I am known as The Blomment Queen. A “blomment” or sometimes “blogment” was coined long ago on my 360° page by my contact New York Eddie. It means to write a blog post in comments either on someone else’s blog or on your own in your own comments as a kind of “blog extension.”

I have already said it here in previous posts that I am WORDY. I go for looooong instead of concise. It’s not really the style of writing well-suited to blogging; it’s more for epic novel writing and if I had it in me to write novels, mine would be that sort which winds up being at least 1,000 pages long.

I just find that I have a lot to say, and I love to respond to people and their writing on their blogs, too! It’s part of what makes me who I am, and I pretty much go with it guilt- and shame-free until I do it in a setting where I think, “Oh my god. I just spilled all that over X’s page.” I think I worry that by posting such long comments people will think, “Hey — she’s trying to one-up the blogger” or “Look at her, she’s trying to hijack that blog with one of her own in the comments.”

When I do this in a setting where people do not really *know* me, not like my friends and regular readers on Multiply, I feel ashamed, like I spilled milk on the Queen’s best rug or something. In fact, a blomment is how I best show appreciation, and I have contacts today who keep me around just SO I will blomment for them. They know and understand its purity in love for them and their blogs.

I blommented today, and felt a little guilty about it. I was on David Lebovitz’s blog on his recent post about “8 Coping Tips for Living in Paris.”

I got so excited about the topic and had so much to say that I blommented all over the place and then went ahead and posted it.

I just went and re-read my comment, and I still think it sounds pretty good for having gone off all over his comments. But I think I feel guilt and shame because of this for a few reasons. For starters: he’s a famous and well-liked guy and/but I honest-to-goodness feel like, when I read his blog, he is one of the posse with whom I have been blogging for a long time. Maybe it is in part that the bloggers whom I read are great writers, like David, so he just feels like one more of the crew.

The blogs I read are mostly by my now-friends, though a few years ago I knew none of those treasured souls. For example, I think of Ken, who comments here, and who hits me in the gut (in a good way) every time he writes about what it was like growing up in California in the 1970s. Then there’s my friend, Michelle, who was chosen as a Yahoo! 360° featured blogger back in 2005. In fact, I think that’s how I connected to her; it’s how many did. She was my first visitor here in Paris last December. See? I have grown close to the people with whom I blog, and there is something about David Lebovitz that recalls this feeling of connectedness and I can’t help but think of him being like my gay, older brother or something, lol. He’s just *that* great and his voice on his blog is *that* great. He makes everyone feel like he or she is his friend on his blog. He even RECOMMENTS (replies to people in comments), for Pete’s sake! How many powerhouse bloggers DO that, eh? Anyway, David is pretty much a Regular Blog Guy and I feel like he has been in my blog circle for years.

Here’s the thing about blommenting on his page, though, that is making my want to self-flagellate: I feel like by starting this blog on Paris I have gone to a newer, bigger high school. It’s the High School of Paris Blogs. It’s the new school year, and I am a lowly freshman, trying out this less whiny, more professional, less f-bomb, more photo-styled sort of endeavor, and, admittedly, going and commenting on David’s blog and leaving my links there because I also get a lot of traffic from his blog to mine, lol. Yeah! Another reason to feel guilty! I am totally leeching off of his blog life-blood! I mean, I go there because he is witty and cool and informative, but so do other people because he is witty, cool, and informative, and other people have gone from his blog to mine. I think I am hoping for wittiness, coolness, and informativeness by association!

Anyway (starting to see WHY I blomment?!), I am this little freshman blogger when it comes to public Paris blogs and he is like the big, popular senior in Paris Blog High — the one that is for SURE going to be Prom King. Successful pastry chef, writer, traveler, blogger — I mean, the guy has even been on TV. And I comment on his blogs because I like him, I like what he represents, I like his outlook on life, and also because every time I go there, I think, “Maybe he’ll notice me!”  and, if he notices me, then SO WILL EVERYONE ELSE. OMG, this is like the plot of every John Hughes (god rest his beautiful soul) film of the 1980′s. I am Molly Ringwald in either “Sixteen Candles” or “Pretty in Pink” and David is Jane Ryan or Blane McDonnagh (Andrew McCarthy *swoon*). When I comment there, it is like I am dreaming of going to prom in PBHS and being prom queen on my own.

And then I think, “Do I really WANT that in my life? To lose anonymity or to have to keep up a persona in blog life that may not really represent ME?” But that is a whole ‘nother blog topic on which I have been ruminating.

So, let me get to the point here. I feel guilt about blommenting. But I was so darn excited about the post that I knew I had to write one of my own about the same topic:

ParisKarin’s Coping Tips for Living in Paris

To preface my own tips, this is what I wrote on David Lebovitz’s post (it helps to visit his post and see his list, just so you have a context, yanno?):

Fantastic post, David, and yes, in principle, after living here for 16 months, I think these are perfect suggestions!! I have a couple things to add, though, because in my “sitch” doing a few of those items up there is complicated for me.

I have to eat dairy, gluten/wheat, sugar, and yeast-free. This means no chocolate, no wine, no pastries, although I have TOTALLY cheated with macarons, lol — at least they don’t have dairy (I don’t think…), gluten, and yeast, so three out of four ain’t bad. Food and drink-related comforts are not really available to me, though, which pretty much sucks some days and can make coping really tough. This past month, I also gave up smoking and coffee. I know, I know!! :p It’s been pretty hard to have one’s comforts in food, drink, and smoke not be available. Yeah, I chose to eat this way but it was because my body was pretty much falling apart without making these changes. The stress of being in a new place was what triggered reactions in my body to start to give out. I felt I had to make all these changes or suffer. And I am doing a lot better, which is the good news! :) Anyway, it’s still hard to not have some of the coping tools on your list up there.

But I have had to learn to cope. We all do, eh?

For someone who has a limited budget (a *really* limited one as I am not working and my BF is an English teacher & supports the two of us), even the shopping is out most days. But, I am finding there is still a lot to do to be able to cope, to find the happy and balance inside when living in a place that, at least for me, often makes me feel like I am a completely retarded child (sorry to use such a non-pc term, but I mean it in a colloquial sense, too).

The suggestion I love the most up there and the one I *do* have available to me & which I engage in regularly is taking trips in Paris. That one item is the thing that has really saved me in trying to handle living in this foreign place — and to milk it for how and what I can. I have learned that what gives me peace in my head is going out in to the city and taking pictures of it. I am not the greatest photographer, but it give my mind something to focus on, something to center it when the merde hits the ventilateur and you think your head is going to explode with it.

And then I started to blog about those trips, hahaha.

I am *so* stealing this post idea, to be properly credited, of course. I best write about this on my own blog instead of here. No fair to highjack your post. I loved reading about your eight ways of coping, though, and what I see that the root of this list is trying to say is “Find the enjoyment that you CAN. Find it in something small, find it for yourself, but FIND it.” That’s great advice whether one is living somewhere foreign or not. I see this way-of-thinking in your blog and in how you present yourself living your life in it. You rock. :)

So, eliminating food and drink from the whole Coping Toolbox, what is there that is left?

1. I Blog.

Hahahahahaha. Seriously, in the 16 months I have lived here, writing at Multiply, Facebook, occasionally MySpace are how I have coped best. When I experienced the crippling agoraphobia and total anxiety about even going out the apartment door a little over a year ago when I first arrived, I knew that my friends were available to me at my fingertips through social networking sites and email. I have used the internet as probably my number one coping mechanism and I am very grateful for it.

This blog, as I explained early on, was born as an attempt to help me get out and live life. Sitting in PJs and my apartment day after day, simply doing housework and keeping up with bloglife is not much of a life. By getting out and about, I experience more of the city and enlarge my life and my existence.

2. As David wrote, I take a trip IN Paris.

That’s what THIS is — my records of the things I see and experience in the city. I whine and curse on the other blogs, lol. This is the one where I try to find the BEST in living in a place like Paris, even though I feel, most times, like a freaked out retarded child in it. It’s getting better. I feel less and less retarded the more I force myself to chronicle things for this blog.

3. I watch movies.

I’ve written about it here, reviewed movies here (for example). PJ and I have a UGC Illimté pass.

For 19 € 80 per month for UGC Carte Illimité or 35 €  per month for a pass for two people (which we have), PJ and I can go and see an unlimited number of movies. We live just near the Mk2 Quai de Loire and Quai de Seine theaters, which accept the passes. We also like to go to the Georges V theater on the Champs-Élysées as it is close to PJ’s job.

To escape into the dark of a theater for a couple of hours and see some of the latest cinema from the States in a language I understand is a true “reset button” for me. I know, it may seem silly to see a bunch of American movies in Paris, but remember, this is a list about how to cope when, as I put it up there in the comment on David’s page, the merde hits the ventilateur and you need ESCAPE from the culture at hand. I am 41. I am (saying this tongue-in-cheek, mostly) not always the most stable of people! I need this a lot. :)

4. I watch TV.

We have a FreeBox. If you live in France and want decent bundled internet/TV/phone and not much hassle, I would say go with Free.

Here’s what I like best about it. Free Home Video is an extra 12 € a month, but in my opinion, it is worth it, if you want to have access to some decent English movies and TV series. PJ and I like to watch a lot on the tube. It’s a good way for him to relax and check out after a day of working with clients in the business English program at which he is an instructor. For me, having FHV is a way to understand TV. I have recently become hooked on Season 1 of Gossip Girl, which is now available on FHV.

Also, several shows on the stations M6 and TF1 are now being broadcast in English if you have a TV or the cable box setup with which you can switch the languages. CSI («Les Expérts») Vegas, Miami and New York are shown in English as are the newest seasons of Bones and Desperate Housewives. There are more programs where one can switch to VM (vérsion multiligual) but that I don’t watch regularly, such as Grey’s Anatomy. Also, old movies on the Turner Classic Movies channel can be accessed in English as well, if they originate from the U.S.

There is one show I can and do watch in French, and have loved since I got here and first saw it: «Un dîner presque parfait» on M6.

It’s a week-long competition where five contestants compete to see who can prepare and serve the “almost perfect” dinner party with the best ambiance, the most appropriate and stylish decorations, and the most delicious food. Competitors rate one another on a scale of 1-10 on the cooking, the ambiance, and the decorations and the participant with the highest average score at the end of the week wins 1,000 €. It’s on weekdays starting at 17.50, which really means 10 minutes to six PM. 5:50 PM. I can’t believe after 16 months I still have to figure out what time it is past noon by subtracting 12. Doing freakin’ MATH every time I want to know what time someone is talking about here makes me MAD, in the British sense of the term. Imagine me talking in a Gwneyth Paltrow adopted British accent when I write that and you’ve got what’s in my head.

5. I take photos.

One of my photos I'm particularly proud of - The Jaurés Café

One of my photos I'm particularly proud of - The Jaurés Café

About a year ago, a couple of people on Multiply, after I posted photos of Paris on my page there, commented on how much they liked my photography. I started to go out and take more photos to post on my page at the request of my friends there. As a result of that, one of my good online friends started to use some of my photography for her graphic design projects. I got inspired, and started to go out and take more and more photos of the city.

Paris is a world fashion headquarters. I often think of her as one of the top models which grace her fashion magazines: it’s hard to take a bad photo of her! It seems every corner I turn, I see something new, I see something unique, beautiful, and quintessentially Paris. Going out with my little Nikon Coolpix, I know I can get my head back on straight with centering in on capturing with the lens what I see around me. This has been a true balm to my soul.

Check out my Flickr page here: Karin’s Flickr Page It’s also on the sidebar here at my blog site.

Now, rinse and repeat!

LOL. I have trouble coming up with eight. These are my top five. I cycle through them day after day.

Here’s one of  my hopes: by blommenting on David’s blog, by visiting others here in Paris Blog High School and leaving my droppings (aka “comments”), I hope I meet others that live and breathe and have their being here. I have been learning a TON about the city from these bloggers. I hope that perhaps one of them will be much like the blogging friends I have in other places: that we will read one anothers’ posts and become friendly, that we will like one another, and maybe hang out sometime. I won’t hold my breath or anything, but maybe David will ask me to Prom! :D *giggle*

Photo found at the Cinecultist dot com

Photo found at the Cinecultist dot com

In the future I hope to comprehensively list here some of the Paris bloggers that I have been visiting, but for starters, try Donna’s blog here: Best Friend in Paris and Shelli and Gene’s blog here: Are We in Paris Yet?

These are two lovely people I have met online, and I think it was through David’s blog! Which, of course, is here: David Lebovitz dot com: The Sweet Life in Paris.

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14 thoughts on “The Girl Can Blomment

  1. You know, not everyone wants to read about Paris from the famous… but some of the more interesting things about the city (or any city) is the experience of the newcomer, who takes nothing for granted, and the less… financially gifted… who finds more creative ways to experience the atmosphere.

    And personally, I’ve always loved your blomments.

    • pariskarin

      Dorid!! Oh wow, so wonderful to see you here! :) And thank you for your blog link, too, as I have already popped by for a moment and put you in G-Reader, too. This is very “bolstering” to me: “the experience of the newcomer, who takes nothing for granted, and the less… financially gifted… who finds more creative ways to experience the atmosphere.” As I am kind of inclined to do (lol — you knowwww, this is one of those things ” *do*, haha), I question my “legitimacy” as a blogger, and in trying to define what in the heck I am doing here, and what I am getting out of it and what others can get out of it, too. Always asking myself, “Is this worth it?” I think I am suffering a bit from comparison-syndrome, too, in checking out others’ blogs and holding my own up in the process, wondering, “Is mine any good and does it have a place in Paris Blog High School?” It’s funny, when I first started it, I just DID it, it was fun, I had no Blog Envy. Methinks I need to grow a pair and remember the idea of what you write: I am ME, I am unique, and I am indeed creative because I am, uhh, less financially gifted (lol – that made me grin, Dorid, as I have always been a huge fan of *your* creativity in financial challenge), and I put this stuff here.

      Shakespeare wrote in Much Ado About Nothing, “Comparisons are odorous,” which I just learned is a play on the expression “Comparisons are odious” Info here: Comparisons are odious. Either way, whether stinky or repugnant, the idea is true: to compare is only going to make me feel less, and I just need to continue to play on what I have to share.

      Thank you for loving my blomments. :)

  2. As a relatively new blogger I think one of the nice things in this cyberspace universe is the reciprocity between bloggers. Hijacking a post is one thing, but commenting on topic is another. Maybe the internet equivalent of dropping by to borrow a cup of sugar. We are all neighbors out here aren’t we?

    Shelli

    • pariskarin

      Hi Shelli! I like your insight! I have found, too, that people who are really, I think, good bloggy folk out there recognize the reciprocity you write about up there and are very cool with it. I like how you compare it to borrowing sugar, and yes, we are neighbors here just as in RL. That’s an apt metaphor for how it can work online. LOL — all of a sudden I am having visuals of not Paris Blog High School, but Wisteria Lane on “Desperate Housewives.” Haha. Clearly, I watch a lot of TV, heh!

      I’m glad you are my neighbor. :)

  3. There have been times when I’ve wanted to share “myself” with folks in RL (real life) and point to one of my blog pages only to find that my blog itself only shows a thin outline of who I am because most of the color and texture I have put into comments I’ve left on others pages that would only be found if one were able to “stalk” me through the net. Even being in my circle doesn’t complete the mosaic, because I’ve dropped deepness on random blogs of strangers who then become friends or I may never read of again.

    I don’t concider long detailed replies as blogjacking, but there have been times when I’ve also commemted on almost every comment also that makes me feel a little guilty. Haven’t had anyone complain yet, so I can only infer that sharing is what the comment section is all about. I really want anything I post to be deconstructed, examined from all angles and discussed among others. It shows that I have posted something of worth and helps me work through the reason I posted it in the first place. Have you ever been attracted to a post because it has an enormous amout of replies only to find it is only all of the posters friends chiming in as if roll call had just been taken? While it is gratifying to be read, isn’t it even more so to stir debate or hear about others like expiriences?

    I blogged about how and why I started blogging by writing long and descriptive e-mails. I have only recently (after years of blogging) been able to kind of recapture that (my creativity is returning. yippie). My style has always been short moments of insight, but it is a talent that I am trying to cultivate to be able to weave those momments into a cohesive story/blog (and really, isn’t that what life is?). I’ve spent year “aping” others through memes and such, but have recently found my own voice once again.

    And it is that voice that is me as that is all that one can expirience on-line, so I cannot “see” creating a personna that I am not on-line (or multiple ones via multiple blogs). I am on-line seeking validation of myyself as a whole rather than just this aspect or other of me. This is not to say that I don’t tailor my comments on others pages to the author (their rules in their house, yanno). I have a wide range of friends and sometimes I cringe when they try to mix (lucky for me, most of those I do bond with are like me and tolorant/respectful of others with whom they might fundamentally disagree).I am also aware of appropriateness (ie: while there are not many, there are some younger folk in my circles and while I will never “talk down” to them, adult language and themes are not appropriate when they are included).

    There are many styles of blogs that I greatly admire, but often I lack the technical expitese to incorporate into my own (your wonderful photo illustrations and detailed deconstruction of any subject for one and have you ever read blogs by my friend GOOD? I love his layered linking via key words mixed in his blog. This is something I dreamed of doing when I discovered social networking). VL mirrors RL when it comes to web celebrity. I’ve always treated all people the same and on a personal level. I may be attracted to their blog out of curiousity generated by what I’ve heard, but if I don’t connect with the content, it doesn’t hit my favorites list and hey, they are basically people just like us (only a little more well known) so why would one treat/talk to them any differently.

    I do want to say that I really didn’t appreaciate my own blogs unbtil I recently wanted to locate an old blog and I read through them on the blog roll. While individually unimpressive to me (exept a couple of little gems I’m rather fond of), reading it on the roll showed the “stream of conciousness” or a flow of my own thoughts that did draw me in and validated the inclusion of each chapter (think of judging your favorite book by just a random chapter, it is just better as a whole).

    I have to reinterate about your response to David the same thing I pointed out on your blog and that is the irony that the things you are cutting out of your life are the very things (other than the history, archatecture, arts, culture, etc) that the place you have moved to is famous for. You literaly have to redefine an appreciation of Paris sans these things.

    Ah, the joys of bundling your media. I steadfastly refuse even though to do so would save me bundles because when one is poor, sometime one has to pay certain things late, sometimes things get cut off or suspended, sometimes, when living on the outskirts of civilization (or even in urban environs) things stop working correctly (outages) and if you recieve your media from different sources you have a better chance on not losing everything at any given time.

    Funny thing about sharing my photos. My tastes are definitely different than those of people who view my photos. Things I am really proud of or I think are interesting get completely passed over and yet things I almost didn’t post and/or think are completely pedestrian draw an amazing amount of attention. I’ve yet to deconstruct peoples taste (exept when it comes to a hint of flesh which seems to be a universal for drawing a crowd).

    boy I could sure use a spell check.

    • pariskarin

      And SEE? A beautiful example of a blomment, folks! :-)

      Of all the wonderful things you wrote up there, I am picking this one because it is about the first half of my post here and it’s something I cannot stop *thinking* about as I troll the web for Paris blogs and plug them into G-Reader. “VL mirrors RL when it comes to web celebrity. I’ve always treated all people the same and on a personal level. I may be attracted to their blog out of curiousity generated by what I’ve heard, but if I don’t connect with the content, it doesn’t hit my favorites list and hey, they are basically people just like us (only a little more well known) so why would one treat/talk to them any differently.”This is so, so, so true, and the thing I keep thinking about as I hope from blog to blog and observe what people are writing about and who comments and how many comments they receive. It is a very close parallel to what happens in RL, as you say. I just keep wondering, do I even WANT to be a student in Paris Blog High School? Do I even WANT David to take me to prom? (lol)

      Anyway, case in point: I love everything about your blomment. I like how you write about finding your voice, and blog styling, how and what works for you… It’s very insightful and a great carry-over to the ponderings I put here. Thanks, Ken.

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